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Hand histories are subjective questions, and as such there won't be a single, definitive correct answer. Does it make sense to accept one? Or should we rely on voting to bubble the best answers to the top?

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  • After a recent comment on my activity (sincere appreciation to @michaelmcgowan), this really needs some discussion. I'm putting together my thoughts on this.
    – Toby Booth Mod
    Jan 24 '12 at 13:29
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Yes, it makes sense to accept an answer. The accepted answer isn't necessarily the only single, definitive answer. It should be accepted based upon being the most helpful to the person asking the question.

If one answer gives a perspective on the hand history that the OP feels is particularly useful, insightful, or applicable to their situation, they should feel free to accept it.

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    We should discourage accepting answers that are simply yes call. We should probably encourage a comment to explain why it was accepted too.
    – Chad
    Jan 20 '12 at 20:11
  • "If one answer gives a perspective on the hand history that the OP feels is particularly useful, insightful, or applicable to their situation, they should feel free to accept it." This particular scenario seems covered by the upvote/downvote facility. Accepting an answer implies that the response received is more definitive, no?
    – Toby Booth Mod
    Jan 24 '12 at 17:29
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    @TobyBooth No, nothing about an accepted answer implies that it is definitive. There are countless examples across various SE sites of accepted answers that have much lower vote scores than obviously better answers. Accepting an answer only means that it is useful to the asker.
    – Beofett
    Jan 24 '12 at 17:34
  • Helpful link, thanks. It seems to me a semantic issue, where "Accepted" from a broader community sense equates to "correct" in many peoples minds, whereas in terms of it's proposed use across Stack Exchange it actually means "most useful to OP author". Just a hypothetical, but what if there are many "most/equally useful" answers? How does an OP author reward members in that situation fairly? There is a bounty facility, but that goes to the accepted answer again.
    – Toby Booth Mod
    Jan 24 '12 at 17:52
  • Actually, the bounty does not have to go to the accepted answer. In fact, I believe only answers given after the bounty is offered are eligible for the bounty, so it may not even be possible to give a bounty to the accepted answer. I agree that given how the term is used, "Accepted" gives a rather confusing impression.
    – Beofett
    Jan 24 '12 at 18:08

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